Pride Flags

Pride Flags

The Queer Community is full of flags that represent the many different parts of who we are as LGBTQ individuals. Some more widely used than others, but still just as important. This page is a chronicle of the history of our original Pride Flag and the flags that came after, and will continue to grow as we grow as a community.

Gilbert Baker Pride Flag

Gilbert Baker Pride Flag

In 1977 Gilbert Baker designed the first Pride flag, as a commission from Harvey Milk, and it was flown during San Francisco Pride the following year.

Traditional Pride Flag

Traditional Pride Flag

The most widely recognized version of the Pride flag, this six color rainbow is seen as a way to encapsulate the entirety of our community.

Trans Pride Flag

Trans Pride Flag

Created in 1999 by Monica Helms to represent transitioning into and representing ones own correct gender, the Light Blue (boys), Pink (girls), and White (transitioning, no or neutral gender and intersex).

Bi Pride Flag

Bi Pride Flag

When the Bisexual flag was first created by Michael Page it was meant to represent the attraction to both male and female genders and the overlap that occurs. Bisexuality today is known as an attraction to genders one identifies with and genders one does not identify.

Asexual Pride Flag

Asexual Pride Flag

Created in 2010, this flag represents the ACE identities including greysexuals (the fluid area between sexuals and asexuals) and demisexuals (people who don’t experience sexual attraction unless they have an emotional connection with their partners)

Pansexual Pride Flag

Pansexual Pride Flag

Also created sometime in 2010 on the internet, the pansexual flag represents the attraction to all genders with pink representing women, the yellow representing non-binary and gender non-conforming individuals, and blue representing men.

There are many other flags within our community and this page will continue to grow to cover all of them. I encourage you to go out there and find a flag that best represents you, and if there isn’t one there, find the creativity within yourself to make one.

This page contains elements and information found from The Complete Guide to Queer Pride Flags by Ariel Sobel on Pride.com. Please visit this article for more information on the history of Pride flags.